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20121128
20121128
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
were some of the largest since the overthrow of president hosni mubarak last year. in syria, government warplanes bombed towns in the north and east, in the face of new advances by rebel fighters. in one attack, the planes dropped barrels filled with explosives and gasoline just west of idlib city. reports of the dead ranged from five to 20. the regime is using intensive air raids to try to beat back rebel gains. forensic experts took samples from the remains of yasser arafat today, hoping to determine once and for all if the late palestinian leader was poisoned. arafat died in 2004. his body was briefly exhumed today in ramallah, on the west bank. we have a report from john ray of independent television news. >> reporter: eight years after they buried him they sealed yasser arafat's tomb for a second time. a dignified ceremony. the palestinian's lost leader has not been allowed to rest peacefully. shielded by blue screens, scientists took samples from his body to try to clear up a near decade of conjecture on the spf theory that says that when a gravely ill arafat said farewell to his
the immediate ramifications of the arab spring, if you like, and obviously you've still got issues in syria. there's still tensions with respect to that. the area isn't going to settle down for quite a long time. that means we're going to have episodic periods where you get, for example, shots just because of tensions in that region. coming back to big global macro we were talking about earlier, that is one of the biggest threats to the global economy. we've got oil prices at fairly reasonable levels right now, but if you stop pushing all prices back above $100 a barrel in west texas towards 110 and 115, that's a serious break to a global economy that's already struggling. >> absolutely. and in the developed world argument, where do you see the markets in 2013? >> i would still be of the broad expectation that emerging markets are better than developed markets at this point. all the legacies that we're still dealing with from the financial crisis. but they have a greater potential to grow. but equally, it's about global demand and if areas like the u.s. are not really growing, areas like eu
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)